Past Issues

Issue 01: Sex & Money

Fiction

Janet Capron
Josip Novakovich
Bruce Benderson

Interview

Jake Greenberg

Poetry

Oriol Roche

Issue 02: Writing Across Eastern Europe (with Olena Jennings)

Fiction

Tanya Silverman
Oleksandr Fraze-Frazenko

Poetry

Anton Yakovlev
Aleksey Porvin
Sergei Yesenin
Anna Malihon

Issue 03: Family (with Chris Molnar)

Fiction

Mina Hamedi

Interview

Sallie Fulerton

Poetry

Benny Morduchowitz

Issue 04: Mind & Body

Fiction

Bonny Finberg
Catherine Texier

Poetry

John Sandbach
Al-Khansā
Casey Jarrin

Issue 05: The Critic As Artist

Fiction

Ursule Molinaro
Casey Jarrin
Dan Callahan
Ursule Molinaro

Interview

Drew Zeiba

Poetry

Wayne Koestenbaum

Issue 06: Fellow Travelers (with Matthew Stadler)

Fiction

Roberto Tejada
Ron Palmer
Bruno George
Rebecca Brown
Robert Glück
Matthew Stadler
Bertie Marshall
Breka Blakeslee
Kevin Killian
Jason R Jimenez

Issue 07: Commitment (with Christopher Stoddard)

Fiction

Tom Cardamone
Steve Anwyll
Scott Neary
Blake Butler
Christopher Stoddard
Lisa Howorth
David McConnell
Bruce Benderson
Gary Indiana
Margaret Barnard

Issue 08: Music & Transformation (with Ian King)

Fiction

J.B. Staniforth
Scott D. Elingburg
Rob Roensch

Poetry

Ian King

Issue 09 - The Poetry Issue

With work by Elaine Equi, Katie Degentesh, Youssef Rakha, K. Eltinaé, Paula Bernett, Leah Umansky, Ace Boggess, Lynne Sachs, Olena Jennings, and Alex Dimitrov.

- Ben Shields

Poetry

Lynne Sachs
Ace Boggess
K. Eltinaé
Olena Jennings
Paula Bernett
Elaine Equi
Alex Dimitrov
Katie Degentesh
Youssef Rakha
Leah Umansky

Issue 10 - Idols & Idolatry

An Aztec emperor’s chambers and the dreary quarters of a worker made ancient by his windowless office: two poems and two universes by Marshall Mallicoat.

At the outset of B.H. James’s “Dale,” we’re in a religious cult whose god is the original Karate Kid film. By the end, we’re in a memoir of marriage counseling, writing, and narrative structure.

In Shani Eichler’s debut story, “The Ties That Bind Us,” a secular Jewish family goes through an identity crisis when their daughter announces her engagement to a non-Jewish young man.

From his recent collections The Sailor and Turncoats of ParadiseJoobin Bekhrad’s six poems are written in a classical style steeped in Iranian mythology.

Dana Schein’s four paintings span from the spontaneity of artistic creation to pressure and melancholic boredom. One image depicts a student excelling in a piano lesson; in another, a man looks on the verge of losing consciousness from lifting the same instrument.

Frank strolls in a vanishing New York in Carl Watson’s novel excerpt, “A streetcorner in limbo.” Aware that nostalgia is just a scarecrow to ward off change, he can’t entirely resist it.

In Mike Corrao’s imagined apartment complex, there’s no reason to stay: landlines are severing, fires igniting, potential meteors dropping—yet no one can bear to leave.

Five poems by Josh Lipson locate his studies of Levantine language and culture as a passageway in which he may declare his allegiance to idle reverie.

The speaker in two poems by Dante Fuoco, calloused by waiting and the wind, runs late and turns the ticking of time into song.

Fiction

Carl Watson
Mike Corrao
B.H. James
Dana Schein
Shani Eichler

Poetry

Josh Lipson
Joobin Bekhrad
Dante Fuoco
Marshall Mallicoat

Issue 11 - Voice (w/ guest editor Buku Sarkar)

Ada Limón, Aleksander Hemon, Tishani Doshi, and others introduce work by Elizabeth Acevedo, Faruk Šehić, Tope Folarin, Vamika Sinha, Tiziano Colibazzi, Quenton Baker, and Birgül Oğuz in a special issue of KGB.

-Ben Shields

Fiction

Buku Sarkar
Birgül Oğuz
Tiziano Colibazzi
Tope Folarin
Faruk Šehić

Poetry

Vamika Sinha
Quenton Baker
Elizabeth Acevedo

Issue 12 - Curators of KGB

A re-launch featuring current and former curators; intended to stoke inspiration from the past and exhibit commitment to the future of the literary community that's developed within the walls at 85 East 4th Street. It will be organized by genre then chronological order of each contributor’s timeline in programming.

Fiction

Rachel Aydt
Shanna McNair, introduction by Rick Moody
Paul Beckman
William Electric Black
Gessy Alvarez
Matthew Kressel

Non-fiction

Alex Vara
Rebecca Donner

Poetry

David Lehman
Leah Umansky
Akeem K. Duncan
Jason Schneiderman
John Deming
Olena Jennings
Matthew Yeager

Issue 13 - Promise and Possibility

Contributors in this issue have addressed the subject of possibility, using genre choices and themes or form to explore stimuli that lure their subjects, and perhaps their readers, to follow the sometimes all-but-impossible promise of love, transformation, power and fame, or perhaps a surprising new way of seeing, thinking. Examples of fiction, nonfiction and poetry addressing the subject are highlighted above and followed up by further examples of these genres as well as additional offerings: an interview on Colum McCann’s Apeirogon, a book review on Jhumpa Lahiri’s new novel, Whereabouts, and a review of the recent Burns/Novick documentary on Ernest Hemingway.

Book Review

Fiction

Michael Cunningham
Ava Robinson

Interview

Non-fiction

Randi Dickson
Annie Rachele Lanzillotto

Poetry

Jason Irwin
Julia Gerhardt
James Croal Jackson
Alina Stefanescu
Ruth Vinz
Sylvia Foley
Holly Day
SK Smith

Issue 14 - Masking

Contributors in this issue have addressed the subject of masking as it refers not only to the actual masks worn for protection during the Covid Pandemic, but also as it relates to disguises, concealments, camouflages, self-deceptions, and/or hidden intentions or realities of characters. Ruth Vinz’s “Thoughts on Masking” muses on various understandings of masks and masking and introduces the idea of masks as potentially valuable in the defining of oneself. Other works, such as a book review by Kasia Bartoszynska, address masking as a literary device employed by writers to hold details or reveal surprise endings or previously unnoticed writing techniques for a final effect. Examples of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry addressing the subject are highlighted above and followed up by further examples of these genres below, as well as additional ones including a TV review of the Netflix series, The Chair, by Editor, Pat Zumhagen

Headshots were provided by writers   All other photos, unless identified, were shot by Pat Zumhagen.

Visual Artists are identified in works where their paintings are featured.

Book Review

Katarzyna Bartoszyńska
Pat Zumhagen

Fiction

Richard Helmling
Andi Grene
Jeb Burt
Frederick Frankenberg
Nicholas Rombes
Madeline Cash

Non-fiction

Ruth Vinz, Karen Green
Steve Slavin
Steve Slavin
Bernadette Bowen

Poetry

John Grey
Ace Boggess
Lisa Simmons
Mary Jane White
Tobi Alfier
Jared Beloff

Issue 15 - December Holiday Medley

December Holiday Medley is a mix of packages all wrapped up and tied with colorful bows to take you through the holiday season. There is a grab bag of New York City poems by Francesca Marais, Tom Pennacchini, and Mary Durocher to excite you, two reviews to invite you to read more over the holidays: Jonathan Franzen’s Crossroads by Pat Zumhagen and Nastassja Martin’s, In The Eye of the Wild by Kasia Bartoszynska, and a nonfiction chapter from Randi Dickson’s new book that could be a belated Hannukah gift. There’s a Secret Santa Seaside Salmagundi by Jeffrey Alfier, George Franklin and Rich Leise to warm you up; a Poetry Pot Pourri by Tim Resau and Scott Renzoni to provide the scents and spirit of the season; and special poems by Patricia Smith, Stella Wong, and Paul Ilechko. There are gifts that have been sent all the way from France–a book chapter by James Graham, a story by Johnsmith “Bughouse” Davis, and a provocative essay about Julian Assange by the mysterious JG. There are also other new stories to read by the fire by Leah Erickson, Terena Elizabeth Bell, Kunal Mehra, and Hadley Franklin. A highlight in this issue is an interview with the talented and celebrated artist, Karen Green, who has generously offered me the use of her unique and wonderful artistic creations in the KGB Lit Mag this year. Thank you, Karen! Happy Holidays to all!

- Pat Zumhagen, Editor

Headshots provided by writers. All other photos, unless identified, were shot by Pat Zumhagen. Karen Green is identified in her interview with her work.

Book Review

Katarzyna “Kasia” Bartoszynska
Pat Zumhagen

Fiction

Hadley Franklin
Kunal Mehra
Cheryl J. Fish
James Graham
Johnsmith “Bughouse” Davis
Leah Erickson
Terena Elizabeth Bell

Interview

Pat Zumhagen

Non-fiction

Randi Dickson With Maritza Farkas Shelley

Poetry

Stella Wong
Patricia Smith
Paul Ilechko
Francesca Marais, Tom Pennacchini, and Mary Durocher
Timothy Resau and Scott Renzoni
Jeffrey Alfier, George Franklin and Richard Leise

Issue 16:

Book Review

Jordan Barger

Fiction

Chandler Klang Smith
Karen Moulding

Interview

Isaac Stackhouse Wheeler

Non-fiction

Cynthia-Marie Marmo O'Brien
Rebecca Suzuki
Augustine Blaisdell

Poetry

Robert Kaplan
Lisa Jarnot
Gloria Mindock
Simone Kearney

Issue 17: Home and Away

INTRO: The best way to enjoy a summer in New York City is to leave as often as possible. The second best way is drinking at KGB.

In Ross Barkan’s “Tad,” our protagonist wanders the United States, trying to escape himself, drawn along by the receding tide of the American century. Jesse Salvo’s pathetic David hopes to transfer to the Indian state of Goa so he can be closer to the casually cruel boss he has fallen in love with. And both Sophie Madeline Dess and Madeline McFarland take us on a trip to Madrid.

Who are we when we’re away from home? these writers ask. If travel changes us, do the changes stick?

Our poets, on the other hand, don’t want to stray too far from the nest.

Ari Lisner’s “Summer,” Mormei Zanke’s “Eating a Sandwich in Tompkins Square” and Matt Proctor’s “Scenes From A Life” are all about city life, though you might not recognize the subject from one poem to the next. Lisner is romantic; Zanke is reflective; Proctor is positively chaotic. Even Aristilde Kirby’s “²d - Baetylus [Side A, Scoubidou Suite],” as much a wormhole as it is a poem, spits the reader out on DeKalb Ave. Sooraz Bylipudi’s “The Errand for Infinite Saturday” is about finding belonging within oneself, while in his poem “The Big E 2023,” Anthony Haden-Guest wonders about the future of the planet Earth, the home that we all share.

- Carrigan Lewis Miller, July 19th, 2023

Fiction

Sophie Madeline Dess
Ross Barkan
Madeline McFarland
Jesse Salvo

Poetry

Sooraz Bylipudi
Aristilde Kirby
Ari Lisner
Mormei Zanke
Matt Proctor
Anthony Haden-Guest

Issue 18: In Movement

This month's contributors are restless. In "The Path of the Wind," Nick Widmer's protagonist walks the Camino de Santiago; a princess goes on a journey in Christopher Hart Chambers' fantastical "Her 3 Empyrean Vassals." Meanwhile, in real life, Blue Jay Walker travels North America in a van.

The pieces in Issue 18 share a focus on action, even mundane motions like a plank in a bathtub (à la Maria Prudente) or the dancing of Alexandra Dine. Morgan Roberts gives us a dramatic plunge in a foggy night, while jason b. crawford asks us to consider the dual meanings of "hoeing."

There is thwarted movement, too, as in "Happy Water Pt. 1 and 2," a duet poem by Olena Boryshpolets and Aodhán Ridenour that hums with frustration as two lovers sit at a dinner table, considering Russia's war in Ukraine.

- Carrigan Lewis Miller, October 27th, 2023

Fiction

Nick Widmer
Morgan Roberts

Non-fiction

Blue Jay Walker

Poetry

Olena Boryshpolets and Aodhán Ridenour
jason b. crawford
Alexandra Dine
Maria Prudente
Christopher Hart Chambers