KGB Bar Archives by Year

2006

2006
March

Journal

March 12, 2006
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO KELLY BRAFFET AND DAVID EVANIER David Evanier, Kelly Braffet As the cold front moved in, and December finally became more like its old self, Kelly Braffet and David Evanier... ›› read more
September

Journal

September 10, 2006
Binnie Kirshenbaum CLICK! - Listen to Elisa Albert & Binnie Kirshenbaum 9.10.06: KGB Bar's Sunday night fiction series returned from summer hiatus this week with readings from Elisa Albert and... ›› read more
September 17, 2006
Rachel Sherman and Karen Russell Click Here to Listen to Karen and Rachel's Reading! 9.17.06: This week's fiction night featured readings from Karen Russell and Rachel Sherman . The two NYC short-... ›› read more
September 18, 2006
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE IMPETUS PRESS READING Willy Blackmore, Jennifer Banash Jennifer Banash and Willy Blackmore , founders of Iowa City's Impetus Press , took over KGB Bar along with almost... ›› read more
September 24, 2006
Ken Kalfus and Mark Z. Danielewsk 9.24.06: CLICK TO LISTEN TO KEN KALFUS & MARK Z. DANIELEWSKI! The house was packed 45 minutes before KGB's latest fiction night began. As guests streamed in, it... ›› read more
October

Journal

October 1, 2006
Kevin Moffett & Amanda Filipacchi 10.1.06: CLICK TO LISTEN TO AMANDA FILIPACCHI & KEVIN MOFFETT! Reading from her novel, Love Creeps , Amanda Filipacchi is the author of Nude Men and Vapor ... ›› read more
October 8, 2006
Kelly Link & Shelley Jackson Kelly Link and Shelley Jackson fans were spilling out into the KGB's hallway on Sunday night eagerly waiting to hear what Link, author of Magic for Beginners, and... ›› read more
October 12, 2006
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO NELL FREUDENBERGER, SAM LIPSYTE, JORDI PUNTI NELL FREUDENBERGER, JORDI PUNTI, SAM LIPSYTE KGB's Sunday night fiction was at its finest with electrifying readings by Jordi... ›› read more
October 15, 2006
10.15.06 CLICK TO LISTEN TO CALVIN BAKER AND KATHERINE MIN Reading from his novel, Dominion , Calvin Baker is the author of Naming the New World and Once Two Heroes . Reading from her novel,... ›› read more
October 22, 2006
Ryan Boudinot, Gonzalo Barr, George Rabasa CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO GEORGE RABASA, GONZALO BARR, AND RYAN BOUDINOT Reading from The Cleansing , George Rabasa's short fiction has appeared in Story... ›› read more
October 29, 2006
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO HEATHER O'NEILL, SARAH HALL AND EMILY MAGUIRE Emily Maguire, Sarah Hall, Heather O'Neill Three eloquent voices in literary fiction graced the podium this Sunday to launch the... ›› read more
November

Journal

November 6, 2006
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO RYAN EFFGEN, ELLEN LITMNAN, CAIMEEN GARRETT Ryan Effgen, Caimeen Garrett, Ellen Litmnan An eager crowd gathered to listen to the crá¨me of the crop authors whose work was... ›› read more
November 12, 2006
Lise Haines, Asali Solomon Sunday, November 12, featured three readers and another well-attended night in KGB's highly-regarded Fiction Reading Series. First up was Carolyn Turgeon , reading for... ›› read more
November 19, 2006
LISA MOORE, HEIDI JULAVITS Canadian author Lisa Moore arrived from Newfoundland only an hour before the reading. She read an erotically charged passage from her American debut Alligator . The novel... ›› read more
November 26, 2006
Tom Hart, Margo Dabaie, Dan Goldman, Nick Bertozzi, Elizabeth Genco Four graphic novelists graced the podium at this reading, hosted by Suzanne Dottino, KGB Literary Director Sunday Night Fiction ,... ›› read more
December

Journal

December 16, 2006
Nick Antosca, Ned Vizzini, Noah Cicero, Tao Lin If Saturday's reading at KGB, which featured four authors who reportedly "might never be in the same room again," is not to be repeated, then bully for... ›› read more

2015

2015
January

Fiction

January 8, 2015
Careening through Paul's head are tricycles mounted by clowns. Their makeup is runny, pasty white augmented by skin tone stripes. Their laughter is malevolent, scraping Paul's eardrums raw. The... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

January 21, 2015
Shane Lindemoen is boldly going in the direction of great Sci-Fi authors before him. Blessed with the talent and the work ethic to create freshly-imagined worlds, time-twisting plots, and fantastical... ›› read more
January 21, 2015
Shane Lindemoen is boldly going in the direction of great Sci-Fi authors before him. Blessed with the talent and the work ethic to create freshly-imagined worlds, time-twisting plots, and fantastical... ›› read more
February

Book Reviews

February 5, 2015
Is there a right way to be happy? The foremost strength of An Amorous Discourse in the Suburbs of Hell (And Other Stories) does not lay necessarily in the beauty of Man Booker Prize shortlisted... ›› read more
February 17, 2015
WHEN POST-PREGNANCY IS A HORROR MOVIE When we meet Ari, the narrator of Elisa Albert 's new novel, After Birth (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), it is a year following her son's birth, and she hasn't... ›› read more
February 24, 2015
Uncertainty and indecision are not limited to any specific demographic, but they are both central to adolescence. Whereas later in life they can lead to wheel spinning, on the path to adulthood they'... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

February 23, 2015
Nietzsche, Clones, “A Guide to the Cinema Tarot,” oh my! Like Oz, there is something mysterious, a little frightening, and wondrous about the realm of Elaine Equi. In Click and Clone, her latest... ›› read more
March

Book Reviews

March 9, 2015
The first story you encounter in See You in Paradise , J. Robert Lennon 's electric book of short stories is "Portal." As easy as it seems to dismiss the idea behind the story--a family of four... ›› read more
March 16, 2015
Welcome to Braggsville (William Morrow) is the story of D'aron Little May Davenport, valedictorian of Braggsville (“The City that Love Built in the Heart of Georgia, Population 712”) high school and... ›› read more
April

Book Reviews

April 7, 2015
Money, religion, sex, intrigue: Mario Vargas Llosa delivers all of these in his new novel, The Discreet Hero (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), as befits a Nobel prize-winning author who stated at the... ›› read more
April 21, 2015
Per Petterson 's I Refuse (Graywolf Press) is, as the title suggests, a novel concerned with egoism and repression. It is also about suffering, and the two protagonists, Jim and Tommy, suffer... ›› read more
May

Book Reviews

May 5, 2015
ODE TO A DYING CITY Vivian Gornick 's elegiac memoir, The Odd Woman and the City: A Memoir (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), is a kind of ode to a liberal, intellectual New York that no longer exists –... ›› read more
May 12, 2015
Set twenty years in the past, Stacy Wakefield 's debut novel, The Sunshine Crust Baking Factory ( Akashic Books ), comes at an opportune time to look back at the heyday of the practice of squatting,... ›› read more
June

Book Reviews

June 24, 2015
Poet and playwright Deborah Levy staked out the territory of post-modern alienation with a vengeance in her first two novellas. 1989's Beautiful Mutants and 1993's Swallowing Geography ( Bloomsbury... ›› read more
August

Book Reviews

August 6, 2015
Susan Neiman 's lively treatise on the how modern society celebrates the trappings of youth and rejects the stigmas of adulthood, Why Grow Up?: Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age ( Farrar,... ›› read more
September

Book Reviews

September 9, 2015
In A Woman Loved ( Graywolf Press ), Russian-born French author AndreᯠMakine uses one writer's obsession with Catherine the Great to ask how history affects individuals, and if it is possible to... ›› read more
October

Book Reviews

October 8, 2015
Fifteen-year-old Julie Winter is a typical teen, but Sara Jaffe 's careful presentation of her coming of age in Dryland ( Tin House Books ) lavishes it with such loving attention to detail that it... ›› read more
October 21, 2015
On every page of Sentences and Rain (Coffee House Press), Elaine Equi 's latest collection of poetry, you will find words and images in surprising, purepoetic, and truth-revealing juxtaposition—pages... ›› read more
October 28, 2015
Lincoln Michel 's Upright Beasts ( Coffee House Press ) is a debut collection of short fiction comprised of genre-bending tales of dark comedy and humanity. From the outset, we are thrust into the... ›› read more
November

Book Reviews

November 4, 2015
Nearly all of the characters featured in Percival Everett 's new short story collection, Half an Inch of Water ({encode=" https://www.graywolfpress.org " title="Graywolf Press"}), are in various... ›› read more
November 11, 2015
One of Europe's preeminent literary enfant terribles is back in force with Submission (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), sowing discomfort among readers across the political spectrum with this satire... ›› read more

Fiction

November 27, 2015
Chapter Two of “Gone Alaska” Arrival Elfin Cove, Alaska.The Southeast Coast. One month past my eighteenth birthday and I was standing at the forepeak, poised to leap, when the skipper of the purse... ›› read more
December

Fiction

December 24, 2015
Review of a Serial Ejaculator: Subway Line 7 and the Antonin Drake MethodWinter usually presents the most desperate moments for an exhibitionist. The cold air turns us into exclusive affairs. We... ›› read more

Book Reviews

December 27, 2015
There is blood on the hands of the American soul. If we are born American citizens, we inherit this stain; but if we begin our lives elsewhere and then choose our American citizenship, we must absorb... ›› read more

2007

2007
January

Journal

January 14, 2007
Jack Livings, Ed Schwarzchild, Art Bradford, Michele Wildgen 1.14.07: KGB's Sunday Night Fiction Series was thrilled to feature readers from StoryQuarterly42 . This issue was guest-edited by Walter... ›› read more
January 21, 2007
Ellis Avery & Joshua Cohen 1.21.07: KGB Bar hosted authors Ellis Avery and Joshua Cohen. It was a fun evening of writing that was heavy on emotion and cultural reckoning. Ellis Avery is a poet as... ›› read more
January 28, 2007
Lynne Tillman and James Cañón 1.28.07: Lynne Tillman and James Cañón read on Sunday to a room full of new and old fans and friends while some of the season's first snow fell outside. Both of these... ›› read more
February

Journal

February 4, 2007
Vendela Vida, Ken Kalfus; David Wain, Zandy Hartig, Ken Kalfus 2.4.2007: Sunday! Sunday! Sunday! KGB hosted a full-contact, no holds-barred championship reading between Vendela Vida and Ken Kalfus ... ›› read more
February 11, 2007
Yael Goldstein and Kevin Shay 2.11.07: Outside it's cold and the streets are pretty empty but inside KGB, it's warm and crowded as Yael Goldstein and Kevin Shay take the podium. Yael Goldstein reads... ›› read more
February 18, 2007
Wayne Koestenbaum, Rhonda Lieberman, Ben Marcus, Geoffrey O'Brien, Matthew Reuchbauer 2.18.07: KGB hosted a tribute to Austrian novelist, playwright and poet Thomas Bernhard (1931-89). A group of New... ›› read more
February 25, 2007
Francisco Goldman & Daniel Alarcon 2.25.07: Snowflakes were falling gracefully down on the quiet "Oscar Night" streets of the Lower East Side while the drinks were pouring generously inside the... ›› read more
March

Journal

March 4, 2007
Angela Pneuman & Anya Ulinich 3.4.07: KGB welcomed two very talented writers - Angela Pneuman and Anya Ulinich. They read to an excited audience who hung on their every funny, wise and... ›› read more
March 11, 2007
3.11.07: A pretty wild night at KGB. Liam Callanan, Elise Blackwell and Joshua Ferris drew a large, boisterous crowd. There was cheering, whooping, laughing and even crying - though we're sure that... ›› read more
March 18, 2007
Deb Olin Unferth, Paul LaFarge, Chris Adrian McSweeney Night, March 18th: The KGB crowd was wall-to-wall in honor of the latest installment of the Sunday night Reading Series. First up was Deb Olin... ›› read more
May

Journal

May 5, 2007
Fade To Blonde, Max Philips; Dutch Uncle, Peter Pavia; Slide, Jason Starr; Suzanne Dottino w/ HCC authors and publisher, Charles Ardai On April 22, 2007 four authors from Hard Case Crime read at KGB... ›› read more
August

Journal

August 1, 2007
On June 2, 2007, the KGB Bar Sunday Night Reading Series hosted the very first reading from the long awaited THE APOCALYPSE READER , an anthology of new and selected short fiction about the end of... ›› read more
October

Journal

October 2, 2007
Cafe Nueva York members Carmen Boullosa, Eduardo Mitre and Naief Yehya For a few hours Sunday evening September 30, 2007, KGB became a little more like Café Tortoni of Buenos Aires as four... ›› read more
October 21, 2007
10.21.07: The Harvard Lampoon furnishes much of America's comedy today. It's surprising that it's former members can display such a variety of stylistic persuasion. Yet at KGB on October 21st, the... ›› read more

Fiction

October 17, 2007
November

Non-Fiction

November 8, 2007
Mary Gaitskill, 21 Mention Mary Gaitskill , and people start thinking about sex. Until her 2005 novel Veronica , Gaitskill was perhaps best known for her short story "Secretary," about a girl, her... ›› read more
November 8, 2007
From the Philadelphia suburbs of his childhood to adolescence in the jazz haze of 1950s Paris to New York City, Steve Geng gained fame on the streets as "Record Steve." While he was mastering the art... ›› read more
November 8, 2007
From the Philadelphia suburbs of his childhood to adolescence in the jazz haze of 1950s Paris to New York City, Steve Geng gained fame on the streets as "Record Steve." While he was mastering the art... ›› read more
November 9, 2007
These are the notes that I took in preparation for, and during, the Brooklyn Book Festival's National Book Critics Circle Panel, which took place in the lecture hall of the Brooklyn Historical... ›› read more

Book Reviews

November 9, 2007
In the Jewish tradition, language is holy. More precisely, one language is holy-Hebrew. Hebrew letters were created by God, the story goes, and are deeply powerful. They can summon new life if... ›› read more

Column

November 9, 2007
As an undergrad, I fell in love, like most young poets, with Neruda, his sweeping images, intense and burning on the page. Neruda made me want to learn Spanish, but alas, I was studying Hebrew. Then... ›› read more

Journal

November 9, 2007
Humor and Baltica (Russian beer) flowed in equal amounts among the jeans-and-glasses wearing crowd at KGB on Sunday for the reading of Elise Blackwell and Porochista Khakpour . Blackwell read first... ›› read more
November 11, 2007
John McCaffrey "Blogging (and Clogging) is Such Sweet Sorrow." -- William "Clyde" Shakespeare Darin Strauss, John Hodgman, and The Co-presidents of Their Fan Club 1.11.07: "I'd just like to know... ›› read more

Fiction

November 9, 2007
Men aren't meant to be young, said the man who'd given his age as thir - forty-one. He shrugged off the false start, smiled slightly - small, borrowed, theatrical gestures that said, Had I been... ›› read more
November 9, 2007
First there is what matters.Once it matters it is measured.Measured as mass. Mass is the amount of matter in an object.For example, in a rifle. In relations of matter and mass,celestial location is... ›› read more
November 9, 2007
You asked how we met. It was a raw night in January. I had stopped at the Viper Room near closing time. A cold martini in my hand was all that stood between me and the fog on Sunset and the steep... ›› read more
November 9, 2007
Before he saw radiance, he saw the way we all see. He saw his wife Rachel as threatening or contributing to his equili-brium; an irritation or, sometimes, someone he loved so that touching her was... ›› read more
November 12, 2007
Blake's is selected from THEY CHANGE THE SUBJECT I was invited to vacation with his family. They were going to go to the beach at Tybee Island this time, and then on to Savannah, where the movie... ›› read more
December

Journal

December 17, 2007
Maxine Swann, Robert Marshall Maxine Swann's short story " Flower Children " won the Cohen Award, the O.Henry Award, and the Pushcart Prize, and was included in The Best American Short Stories 1998... ›› read more

Book Reviews

December 31, 2007
Impetus Press, August 2006 $17.95, 353 pages Will Alice find her way out of the looking glass? Will Sharlene find her way out of her world of mirrors where everything depends on the quality of her... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
At times brilliant, at times tactical and plain, Shari Goldhagen's Family and Other Accidents has moments of wisdom, wistfulness and elegiac beauty as it describes relationships atrophied by... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harper Perennial, October 2006, 304 pages, $13.95 They say that Eskimos have 1000 words for snow yet the English language only has a handful of words to describe rain. The enormously talented Sarah... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Coffee House Press, October 2006 218 pages, $14.95 Identity is fluid in Brian Evenson's The Open Curtain , a novel that probes into the secrets of Mormonism. Rudd, a Utah teenager, finds an article... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Viking Adult, February 2007 336 pages, $24.95 There aren't too many towns in America where a fourteen year-old can lose her virginity inside a giant concrete pipe. Still rarer is the municipality... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Thaddeus Rutkowski 's novel Tetched is described by the author as "a novel in fractals." And indeed, it is in the structure where much of its allure lies. Rutkowski has created a work both suitable... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Hard Case Crime, May 2007 202 pages, $6.99 One thing that unites crime stories, noir fiction, and other good pulps is velocity. They're short and swift, grabbing you by the lapels and keeping you... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Dalkey Archive Press, July 2007 79 pages, $9.50 14 writers contributed to As You Were Saying; Marie Darrieussecq and Rick Moody; Camille Lauren and Robert Butler; Jacques Roubaud and Raymond Federman... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Picador, August 2006 224 pages, $14.00 In the essay collection Gone to New York , Ian Frazier delves into New York City just as an explorer from a far-off land would study an exotic locale. Having... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
W. W. Norton, August 2006 320 pages, $15.95 Flash Fiction Forward , edited by James Thomas and Robert Shapard, is the newest compilation of flash fiction in an already well-populated category of... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Robert Westfield's debut, Suspension , has a plot, but you don't need to pay attention to it to enjoy the novel; the bulk of its pages pay loving homage to New York City. Westfield builds the... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
New Press, April 2007 240 pages, $22.95 Lore Segal's collection of short fiction, Shakespeare's Kitchen , is not quite a sequel to her last novel, Her First American. The protagonist of both works is... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
McSweeney's, August 2006 $24.00, 480 pages If the physical maladies afflicting the patients in Chris Adrian's The Children's Hospital are rare and complex, the spiritual sickness plaguing the... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
The precocious child narrators of St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves , Karen Russell's daring debut, face hurdles far greater than puberty. The children have fathers with horns, voices that... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Akashic, March 2007 59 pages, $10.95 As sensitive readers we hesitate to admit it, but we are nearly always disappointed when a preposterous premise turns out to be the protagonist's dream, or... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harper Collins, January 2007 272 pages, $24.95 Place was paramount in Daniel Alarcon 's 2005 short story collection, War by Candlelight . Whether imprisoned in a Peruvian jail or window shopping on... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
In the first few panels of DMZ: On the Ground , the first collection of Vertigo's ongoing comic book, graffiti states that "Every day is 9/11." However, even if 9/11 has a symbolic significance for... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Knopf, September 2006 336 pages, $25.95 As we stare into gaping holes left in New York and New Orleans, it's hard not to draw comparisons to the hole we've burned, by our own devices, into arguably... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Starcherone Books, July 2007 228 pages, $16.00 Told from a multitude of perspectives, Joshua Harmon's debut novel, Quinnehtukqut , explores a fractured form of storytelling. Set in the same tracts of... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Mykel Board's Even A Daughter Is Better Than Nothing lacks the type of overt soul-searching and self-discovery that one might expect from a travel book, much less one in which the author travels to... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Archipelago Books, April 2007 260 pages, $25.00 This overtly poetic Midwestern Gothic has a rhythm and pull that carries it through its sometimes overwrought stylings. Jason "Coleman" Moore is an... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harper Perennial , October 2006 352 pages, $13.95 Lullabies for Little Criminals by Heather O'Neill is a hilarious and heartrending look at the life of a teenager navigating the critical transition... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Cleis Press, October 2006, 144 pages, $13.95 The real question in Stephen Elliott's short story collection My Girlfriend Comes to the City and Beats Me Up is not whether these tales are... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Little, Brown, September 2006, 352 pages, $24.99 Janet Fitch 's novels make fine companions for the beach, the subway, the doctor's office waiting room. Page-turners, they flow with a fairly... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Little, Brown, October 2006, 400 pages, $23.99 Women's Liberation, Black Power, Chicano Pride, Gay Pride: the 1970s in America were characterized by sexual revolution and cultural change,... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Scott Snyder's new story collection, Voodoo Heart , is an ensemble that trumpets the arrival of an inspired and imaginative young American writer. The book, Snyder's first, is comprised of seven... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Thaddeus Rutkowski 's novel Tetched is described by the author as "a novel in fractals." And indeed, it is in the structure where much of its allure lies. Rutkowski has created a work both suitable... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Viking Adult, February 2007 336 pages, $24.95 There aren't too many towns in America where a fourteen year-old can lose her virginity inside a giant concrete pipe. Still rarer is the municipality... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Coffee House Press, October 2006 218 pages, $14.95 Identity is fluid in Brian Evenson's The Open Curtain , a novel that probes into the secrets of Mormonism. Rudd, a Utah teenager, finds an article... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harper Perennial, October 2006, 304 pages, $13.95 They say that Eskimos have 1000 words for snow yet the English language only has a handful of words to describe rain. The enormously talented Sarah... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
At times brilliant, at times tactical and plain, Shari Goldhagen's Family and Other Accidents has moments of wisdom, wistfulness and elegiac beauty as it describes relationships atrophied by... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harcourt, January 2007 336 pages, $25.00 In her author's note Cris Beam is careful to point out that her book is not intended to represent the transgender community as a whole. Although Transparent... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Grove Press, September 2006 448 pages, $15.00 The characters in Paulo Lins' City of God have developed immunity to the world. They are capable of killing without batting an eye. This absence of love... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Algonquin Books, September 2006 144 pages, $14.95 I suggest meditating before reading Satish Kumar's The Buddha and the Terrorist . Take time before opening this diminutive 121-pager to focus on the... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Melville House, May 2007 Eeeee Eee Eeee: 211 pages, $14.95 Bed: 278 pages, $14.95 Who is Tao Lin? Notorious for his weird monotone readings (and online suicide threats), hated by Gawker for his... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Hill & Wang, November 2006 112 pages, $15.95 The road to respectability for the literary graphic novel was more or less paved in 1992 by Art Spiegelman's Pulitzer-winning Maus . Mr. Spiegelman... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Fugue State Press, January 2006, 336 pages, $16 Stet is the story of a Soviet filmmaker who might really be-at least to Authority, and to the imposed and imposing tastes of the lumpenproles-no... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Pantheon Press, September 2006, 384 pages, $26.00 Mark Z. Danielewski's Only Revolutions is two books in one, or two books that make a third: a road novel to be read left to right in the voice of Sam... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
New Directions, September 2007 96 pages, $11.95 Alexander Kluge is a German author, filmmaker, and the founder of Ulm Institut fír Filmgestaltung, the institute that birthed New German Cinema. As the... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Every few years, death makes a comeback. Since the late 1970s, when Siouxsie Sioux declared herself a "gothic pixie," a death-obsessed aesthetic has cycled in and out of popular culture (and that's... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, January 23, 2007 272 pages, $25.00 Deep down we know that every work of history is a work of fiction: most often a portrayal of a past in which the writer did not live,... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
AR Ammons once said: "I have 4/interests--money, poetry, sex, death." In Lynda Hull's three poetry collections, Ghost Money , Star Ledger , and The Only World , compiled here in a single volume as... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Soft Skull Press, October 2006, 320 pages, $15.00 I won't reveal the name of the narrator-protagonist of Lynne Tillman's American Genius , since it pops up suddenly, almost arbitrarily, in the last... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Bill Buford is not afraid to get his feet wet. For his first book, Among the Thugs , the Granta founder and former New Yorker fiction editor immersed himself in the world of British soccer hooligans... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, January 2007 256 pages, $23.00 The bland nature of Arlington Park 's opening line, "All night the rain fell ...", is a demand for innovation. Paradoxically, by employing... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Drawn & Quarterly, November 2006 112 pages, $15.96 Gabrielle Bell's autobiographical, award-winning minicomic, Lucky , is now an elegant hardback thanks to Drawn & Quarterly . In Lucky , Bell... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harper Perennial, September 2006 336 pages, $13.99 A fierce student-teacher affair forms the core of first-time novelist Emily Maguire 's Taming the Beast . Encasing this passionate narrative is a... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Imagine wading through a field of wild grass that extends over your head. Your ruined shoes squish through mud; vines grasp your ankles. Wind whispers voices you cannot understand. You came looking... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Harcourt, May 2007 240 pages, $23.00 First published in Poland in 1999, and recently released in English via Harcourt, Nine is a rant of a novel that careens like a commuter bus without brakes... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Pantheon, November 2006 272 pages, $23.00 Daniel Kehlmann's Measuring the World , which was on the German bestseller list for over a year, is a rich and comic novel that will reward the readers who... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Hill and Wang, September 2006 128 pages, $30.00 This graphic adaptation of The 9/11 Report brings a new immediacy to the original assessment of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In this... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Milkweed, May 2007 308 pages, $22.00 Bombay is often said to be a city of paradoxes. In Anosh Irani's second novel, The Song of Kahunsha , the city (now called Mumbai) is sensually rich though... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
In The Thin Place , Kathryn Davis creates another world, a semblance similar to the one we inhabit, yet composed of different primordial ether. Davis details the events of one season in a conjured... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
New Directions, November 2006, 288 pages, $45.00 As one of the most charming, itinerant and unorthodox publishers America has known, what better form could the autobiography of James Laughlin take... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
University of Iowa Press, March 2007 184 pages, $22.50 Grammar Lessons , by Michele Morano, is a thought-provoking collection of thirteen personal essays grouped by her three stages of experiences... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Lara Vapnyar's first novel, Memoirs of a Muse , tells the story of Tanya, a young woman who moves from Moscow to live with her struggling immigrant relatives in 1980's Brighton Beach. Tanya's... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Coffee House Press, September 2006256 pages, $14.95 Henry: thief, loser, and the main character in Laird Hunt's creepy novel The Exquisite , relates his story like a shell-shocked vet, weaving... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
MacAdam Cage, October 2006 300 pages, $16.50 William Gay's Twilight borrows heavily from Cormac McCarthy's semi-autobiographical Suttree ; it is somewhere between a homage and an imitation. Both take... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
In a city where housing projects and luxury day spas coexist, and young hipsters awash in bling rub elbows with old immigrants held together by support hose, Douglas Light conjures up a mixed-bag of... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Scribner, May 2007 256 pages, $26.00 "All plots tend to move deathward. This is the nature of plots. Political plots, terrorist plots, narrative plots, plots that are part of children's games. We... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, December 2006 320 pages, $25.00 If the soul of religion, any religion, can be imposed from the top down, more than Islam is in trouble. A seasoned reporter for the Wall... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Knopf, October 2006 352 pages, $26.95 Stefan Kanfer just might know every detail of the last 150 years of Eastern European and American Jewish history. In Stardust Lost , he manages to fit most of... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, September 2006 185 pages, $22.00 Jonathan Franzen is normal. He may write more bestselling novels than you, or even make more public affronts to Oprah's integrity than you... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Soft Skull Press, June 2007 192 pages, $16.00 Hotel Theory is Wayne Koestenbaum's new flawed but illuminating -- and surprisingly enjoyable -- theoretical exercise. The volume actually contains two... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
One of the great challenges in writing fiction about illness is keeping the story about people when the reality of medical constraints threatens to dominate. While readers want their authors to get... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Scribner, January 2007, 288 pages, $24.00 Colm Tíibín 's dazzling new collection of short stories, Mothers and Sons , contains-as one would expect from the title-multiple mother-son relationships,... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
University of Iowa Press, October 2006 176 pages, $15.95 The title is more apt and to the point than any synopsis could be: the characters in Kevin Moffett's book of short stories are all precisely... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Soho Press, October 1, 2006, 304 pages, $23.00 In The Texicans , Nina Vida combines reverent tones of magical realism with the brutality of a Cormac McCarthy novel to create a captivating and... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
In a pulp exposé occupying a realm somewhere between soap opera and History Channel mini-series, Sara Gruen neatly packages a cavalcade of spectacle-Americana into a commercially viable romance... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, December 2006 416 pages, $15.00 Adam Rapp's coming-of-age novel, The Year of Endless Sorrows , places its unnamed narrator, a new graduate and Midwestern naá¯f, in the... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Five dead girls, a missing pilot, CIA cover-ups, a runaway, and a mysterious unidentified serial killer. In Kelly Braffet 's new novel, Last Seen Leaving , these typical thriller scenarios are... ›› read more

Column

December 31, 2007
Judith Ayer Doyle and Sandy Taylor next to the small press they used in the 1970s and early 1980s. Judith Ayer Doyle is a co-director of Curbstone Press. As an undergrad, I fell in love, like most... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Visit the First, in which we become acquainted, explain our intentions, and introduce our inaugural selections. Dear Reader. I know you. You're a bookshelf spectator. When you pay a visit to a friend... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Naomi Long Madgett, Lotus Press, Publisher Poetry is a labor of love-no surprise there, but I hope what you find in this series of monthly articles will. As a poet myself, I often feel as if what I... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Late afternoon in The Secret Library , patrons mostly nestled in the window seats with leather-bound editions of Swann's Way , browsing the dusty curio shelf. Late afternoon, late in the season, and... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
I commenced begging. "Listen, I'll pay it, please, that's my flight. I have to go on it." "Forget it, you're antisocial, the flight's closed," she said. She gathered up some papers and started... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
I. The Empty Vessel Project I used to work odd, early hours in an empty office, at an open cubicle, overlooking a grille of unoccupied cubicles. To an increasingly disconcerting degree, I'd identify... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Don't let that charming grin fool you. Charles Ardai 's business is crime. By day, he puts in long hours as the co-founder and editor of Hard Case Crime , an exciting independent publishing house he... ›› read more
December 31, 2007
Essayist Edward Hoagland once told me that writing was a 'real lone-wolf enterprise.' Obviously, crime fiction authors Ken Bruen and Jason Starr missed that memo. In 2006, the duo wrote Bust (Barry... ›› read more

2008

2008
February

Non-Fiction

February 1, 2008
Steve Erickson 's many novels ( Days Between Stations , Rubicon Beach , Tours of the Black Clock , Arc d'X , Amnesiascope , The Sea Came in at Midnight , Our Ecstatic Days ) read as if written for... ›› read more
February 3, 2008
Translated by Anna K. Andrade HALF PIPE, Luiz Roque Filho. Video Intervention , Centro Administrativo Fernando Ferrari . Porto Alegre. BRACNER Important Book: Arabian Nights (2005 Portuguese... ›› read more
May

Column

May 1, 2008
It would have been spring. The neighborhood yards still yellow and concrete-hard, the side panels of the cars you pass on the way home from work spattered with arcing crusts of road salt, the big... ›› read more
May 2, 2008
[Excerpt] It would have been spring. The neighborhood yards still yellow and concrete-hard, the side panels of the cars you pass on the way home from work spattered with arcing crusts of road salt,... ›› read more
May 22, 2008
It was about 500 degrees in the Cuban prison. I had been here only three hours, but I honestly thought I might die soon. I had diarrhea. I was dehydrated. I hadn't eaten in two days. There was one... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

May 27, 2008
It was the hottest day in New York in over fifty years and the legendary Morgan Entrekin, president and publisher of Grove/Atlantic, seemed right at home in the heat. His slight accent, ease and... ›› read more
May 27, 2008
It was the hottest day in New York in over fifty years and the legendary Morgan Entrekin, president and publisher of Grove/Atlantic, seemed right at home in the heat. His slight accent, ease and... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
I met Jhumpa Lahiri when she read from her novel, The Namesake , at KGB Bar as part of the Sunday Night Fiction Series along with Susan Choi (author of American Woman ). Jhumpa arrived carrying her... ›› read more

Fiction

May 28, 2008
The Man Who Could See Radiance Before he saw radiance, he saw the way we all see. He saw his wife Rachel as threatening or contributing to his equili¬brium; an irritation or, sometimes, someone he... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Elise BlackwellChapter Forty-NineJackson Miller, in the middle of one of the strangest nights of his life, felt nothing short of fractured. In a room full of aspiring writers—who the hell else... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Where They're AtJoshua FurstThey're everywhere, these kids: Seattle, Milwaukee, Reno and Austin, New York and LA and Chicago, Atlanta, they congregate wherever there's urban ruin; Rochester,... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Lives of the ArtistsIn the morning Robert lies in bed watching patterns made by the sun on the floor and laments his predicament. Why did he have to be born at this moment in history, when all the... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Dearest Eva,Do you remember, love, the summer night we spent in my uncle's chalet off Como, when we thought we heard a ghost in the parlor? I know now that it was a ghost, and, I tell you, we will... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Vanessa Placeand here's where I'd ask you to pay close attention, Johann, we're getting to the part whereeverything changes and yet stays the same, if I had a cross, here's where I'd stick it, and if... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Benjamin Noam Pearlberg Behind her house, in the back woods where the river rushed lazy and gentle, she went bathing at dawn with her best friend, Shoshana Epstein. Batya was not yet seventeen and... ›› read more
May 28, 2008
Dale PeckFruit Salad Men aren't meant to be young, said the man who'd given his age as thir—forty-one. He shrugged off the false start, smiled slightly—small, borrowed, theatrical gestures that said... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
From GAY AVIATION TODAY, January 2004(Reprinted with permission, ©2004 GAT Media Inc.)Over seventy-five years after making aviation history with the first solo, nonstop transatlantic flight from New... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
My daddy, my daddy, he got a 1972 Olds Cutlass Supreme, a convertible that car is, metallic flake green with saddle interior and a three-fifty cubic inch V8 that'll churn out three hundred fifty... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
Image used with permission from Mentality Design Fontanka, St. Petersburg, Russia prologue: crash It had been a bad night, anyway. He'd had too much to drink, she hadn't had enough, and they'd ended... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
Autumn rains spill waterUpon the barren soil.Forgetting the sun,Seedlings long to sprout.I hear the wind's lament.I relive it always. I relive that day, the day the Gaki came to my village. I know I... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
BottleTwo guys are sitting together in a bar. One of them is majoring in something or other in college, the other abuses his guitar once a day and thinks he's a musician. They've already had two... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
You sit in your cubicle on the 37th floor of a multinational pharmaceutical company, paging through a stack of medical journals. Each time you spot the name of a drug that the pharmaceutical company... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
In an airplane flying west across a wine-dark sea, Spiros travels to his new country. He is an inexperienced traveler and for now the gods look kindly upon him, blowing a gentle tailwind and seeing... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
Image used with permission from Mentality Design | Central park in Kharkov, Ukraine It was in my sixth year, shortly before my birthday, that my mother took us to live with her mother, Dominique, in... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
The peanuts, the coconut curlicues, sour cream, raisins, and the small bowl of mango chutney are waiting on the living room table for the boiled rice and lamb curry. My mother's still cooking in the... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
[Excerpt]Selection 1:Kroll runs down the road with his wife draped over his arms like a sheet. He thinks of a scene from his favorite movie, Avalon, where a boy runs home after accidentally setting... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
I waited until I was twenty-one to buy a gun, although, as I learned on the day of the purchase, I had been legally eligible for one since my sixteenth birthday. In my car outside the hunting store,... ›› read more
May 30, 2008
Crazy ideas come naturally from a jumper worth talking about To speak about someone or about something means, to my mind, awarding them some privilege. For my part I don’t award that privilege to... ›› read more
June

Non-Fiction

June 2, 2008
By Aaron Hamburger Depending on your point of view, Tel Aviv-based writer Etgar Keret is a charming prankster or a spoiled brat. To his legions of avid fans, Keret's wry, frank, and often surreal... ›› read more
June 4, 2008
The highly anticipated second album from We Are Scientists , Brain Thrust Mastery , hit the shelves in the United States in mid-May after being available in the U.K and Europe since early spring. The... ›› read more
After Hours:
June 4, 2008
The highly anticipated second album from We Are Scientists , Brain Thrust Mastery , hit the shelves in the United States in mid-May after being available in the U.K and Europe since early spring. The... ›› read more
After Hours:
June 10, 2008
Kristin Pulkkinen, Publicity Director, Luke Gerwe, Assistant Managing Editor, and Richard Nash: (Photo by Susan Chi)On the eighth floor of 55 Washington Street in DUMBO, Richard Eoin Nash, Publisher... ›› read more
June 10, 2008
Kristin Pulkkinen, Publicity Director, Luke Gerwe, Assistant Managing Editor, and Richard Nash: (Photo by Susan Chi)On the eighth floor of 55 Washington Street in DUMBO, Richard Eoin Nash, Publisher... ›› read more
June 16, 2008
When I spoke with Dennis Loy Johnson and Valerie Merians of Melville House Press at their Hoboken office on the “Left Bank” as they fondly called it, in 2007, they had just won the Mariam Bass Award... ›› read more

Column

June 2, 2008
by Jonathan Lachance, photos by Erika Imberti If you walked through the tourists who throng the market stalls in Union Square's South Plaza like unmoored dirigibles on July 22nd, your course would... ›› read more
June 5, 2008
Buckminster Fuller and Isamu Noguchi 1971 I recently went to the show at the Noguchi Museum called "Best of Friends," an exhibition chronicling the collaborations between Buckminster Fuller and Isamu... ›› read more
June 6, 2008
By Robin Epstein I confess I've never gotten off on animation, but for the sake of art, I was willing to give it a try. Truth is, I was looking forward to the screening of Eiichi Yamamoto's erotic... ›› read more

Fiction

June 10, 2008
Katherine Min EYELIDS When I was very young, my mother made me wear a clothespin at night to encourage my nose to form a salient bridge, instead of disappearing into the front of my face and emerging... ›› read more
June 12, 2008
By Pauls Toutonghi Prologue My dad, drunk again and singing. In a previous life of his, my dad dreamed of becoming a country and western singer. The fact that he'd lived this life in a concrete... ›› read more

Book Reviews

June 20, 2008
Fukú is not a spelling-check-be-damned "fuck you," but a curse - a mucho mala dose of rotten ju ju , and the lurking theme of Junot Díaz's scintillating new novel, The Brief and Wondrous Life of... ›› read more
June 20, 2008
The Father Shore Matthew EckMilkweed, Oct. 2007, 192 p. In his short story “How to Tell a True War Story,” Tim O'Brien sets the parameters for stories about war. He writes, “A true war story is never... ›› read more
July

Non-Fiction

July 1, 2008
by Michael Liss Jay Ryan has risen as one of underground poster art's most prolific and talented artists. His hand-drawn, silkscreen posters have announced Chicago's top concerts for the past decade... ›› read more
July 1, 2008
by Olena Jennings Martin Riker is the assistant director of Dalkey Archive Press. He and I met on an August night after a reading at the KGB Bar—I drank a Baltika while Riker spoke about his... ›› read more
July 1, 2008
by Suzanne Dottino It was the hottest day in New York in over fifty years and the legendary Morgan Entrekin, president and publisher of Grove/Atlantic, seemed right at home in the heat. His slight... ›› read more
July 1, 2008
by Olena Jennings Martin Riker is the assistant director of Dalkey Archive Press. He and I met on an August night after a reading at the KGB Bar—I drank a Baltika while Riker spoke about his... ›› read more
July 1, 2008
by Suzanne Dottino It was the hottest day in New York in over fifty years and the legendary Morgan Entrekin, president and publisher of Grove/Atlantic, seemed right at home in the heat. His slight... ›› read more
July 1, 2008
by Michael Liss Jay Ryan has risen as one of underground poster art's most prolific and talented artists. His hand-drawn, silkscreen posters have announced Chicago's top concerts for the past decade... ›› read more
July 2, 2008
by Cheryl Burke Full disclosure: I have known Janice Erlbaum for over a decade. I first met her in the mid-nineties while she was performing with the all-female poetry group The Pussy Poets. One of... ›› read more
July 2, 2008
by John Haskell I recently went to the show at the Noguchi Museum called "Best of Friends," an exhibition chronicling the collaborations between Buckminster Fuller and Isamu Noguchi, and what struck... ›› read more
July 2, 2008
Interview by Suzanne Dottino I met Jhumpa Lahiri when she read from her novel, The Namesake , at KGB Bar as part of the Sunday Night Fiction Series along with Susan Choi (author of American Woman )... ›› read more
July 2, 2008
by Mary Phillips-Sandy For more than fifty years a synagogue has stood at the northeast corner of West End Avenue and West 100th Street in Manhattan. The synagogue is called Congregation Ansche... ›› read more
July 2, 2008
by Mary Phillips-Sandy For more than fifty years a synagogue has stood at the northeast corner of West End Avenue and West 100th Street in Manhattan. The synagogue is called Congregation Ansche... ›› read more
July 2, 2008
Interview by Suzanne Dottino I met Jhumpa Lahiri when she read from her novel, The Namesake , at KGB Bar as part of the Sunday Night Fiction Series along with Susan Choi (author of American Woman )... ›› read more

Column

July 22, 2008
/images/lit/arthur1.jpeg/images/lit/arthur2.jpg Got a writer . . . got a writer . . . Sometimes I feel like a junkie looking for a quick fix when I look at the KGB calendar and see that I need to... ›› read more
July 22, 2008
Michael Scammell [This excerpt describes Koestler's first visit to France after the publication and huge success of his novel, Darkness at Noon , in French translation. It is taken from a chapter... ›› read more
July 22, 2008
Diane Rostyak Aurore and I became friends after my mother invited her up to our apartment one summer afternoon. "Remember Aurore from Florence Avenue School?" my mother asks, always excited for new... ›› read more
August

Column

August 8, 2008
by Victoria Gomelsky Straining to revive long-forgotten memories, I stared at the balcony of my former apartment, a one-bedroom I shared with my parents and twin sister in the fall of 1978, when we... ›› read more
August 8, 2008
By Nancy Agabian {Excerpt} I was sitting between two men on the Aeroflot flight from Moscow to Yerevan, at 1 in the morning, September 10, 2005. The man to my left was large and mid 40's, with brown... ›› read more
August 11, 2008
by Anne K. Yoder A thin forest green box lies adrift in a sea of papers: meticulous diagrams of conical and cylindrical machine parts, a small sliver with a few words, a vortex of ninety-three sheets... ›› read more
August 11, 2008
by Priya Jain At the beginning of The Lieutenant of Inishmore , two men are standing in a small, bleak living room; the beaten-up chairs and stained walls, and the sparse black-rock landscape beyond... ›› read more
August 11, 2008
by Brendan McCall Halloween is a time of tricks and mischief. This past Halloween marked the release date of a special treat for crime fiction fans: a new book by Mickey Spillane , the godfather of... ›› read more
August 13, 2008
by Brendan McCall Essayist Edward Hoagland once told me that writing was a ‘real lone-wolf enterprise.' Obviously, crime fiction authors Ken Bruen and Jason Starr missed that memo. In 2006, the duo... ›› read more
August 13, 2008
by Brendan McCall Don't let that charming grin fool you. Charles Ardai 's business is crime. By day, he puts in long hours as the co-founder and editor of Hard Case Crime , an exciting independent... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

August 16, 2008
Not a Sunday night goes by when I don't think of Ken Foster. As I stand behind the duct-taped podium wedged in the corner of the KGB Bar, just as I am about to introduce the authors, I think: Would... ›› read more
August 16, 2008
Not a Sunday night goes by when I don't think of Ken Foster. As I stand behind the duct-taped podium wedged in the corner of the KGB Bar, just as I am about to introduce the authors, I think: Would... ›› read more
September

Column

September 4, 2008
Lawrence Block, Hit and Run 304 pages, $24.95Published by William MorrowKeller is back.This spring, Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Lawrence Block rolled out the latest exploits of Keller,... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

September 11, 2008
Steve Erickson 's many novels ( Days Between Stations , Rubicon Beach , Tours of the Black Clock , Arc d'X , Amnesiascope , The Sea Came in at Midnight , Our Ecstatic Days ) read as if written for... ›› read more
September 16, 2008
These are the notes that I took in preparation for, and during, the Brooklyn Book Festival's National Book Critics Circle Panel, which took place in the lecture hall of the Brooklyn Historical... ›› read more

Fiction

September 14, 2008
In his 7 th floor apartment on Roosevelt Road , Wan Hao-hsien ( 溫浩賢 ) anguishes over his blueprints for a new kitchen god shrine. If life imitated television dramas and commercials, Taipei would be... ›› read more
September 14, 2008
Vernon Wilson “What the fuck was I saying? Nothing about what you were saying right?” My hand fell on Tasha's arm. We were on Canal Street going towards Broadway. We'd been waiting for the light when... ›› read more
September 16, 2008
Image used with permission from Mentality Design [Excerpt] Even though he is across the room and reading I know he is watching me. My boyfriend likes to keep tabs on where I am so he can determine... ›› read more
September 16, 2008
Sometimes I give speeches at elementary schools. I wait backstage in the wings where they hang the discarded costumes of the four food groups, costumes that are now unused, in light of the Surgeon... ›› read more
September 16, 2008
Tell the story of your father's life,and your father's father's life,and find your own, or findsomething altogether new,an antipodes of the expected.Expect to find, what? A historyof habitude? A... ›› read more
October

Radio Hour

October 10, 2008
The Mark Jacobson KGB Radio Hour 10/1/2008:
October 10, 2008
The Mark Jacobson KGB Radio Hour 8/4/2008:
November

Radio Hour

November 17, 2008
The KGB Radio Hour with Mark Jacobson 11/5/2008:

Demo of the Month

November 18, 2008
Radio Free - Original Cast Recording Performed by Vadim Newquist, Written By Denis Woychuk And Rob McCulloch:
December

Radio Hour

December 4, 2008
The KGB Radio Hour with Mark Jacobson 12_03_08:

2009

2009
January

Radio Hour

January 12, 2009
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson January 2009:

Column

January 15, 2009
WEEK 1 UNRELIABLE NARRATORDo you want a reliable narrator? An unreliable narrator? If there is any first-person element to your narration, there's one answer: all people lie to themselves, all people... ›› read more

Demo of the Month

January 23, 2009
No Medication Written By Denis Woychuk And Rob McCulloch From Attorney For The Damned :
March

Demo of the Month

March 9, 2009
:

Radio Hour

March 9, 2009
The KGB Radio Hour with Mark Jacobson 3/4/2009:

Fiction

March 22, 2009
The ritual is the best part, the pouring of white powder from the brightly colored construction paper envelope onto the glass table, the chopping of it with an American Express card, the rolling of... ›› read more
March 22, 2009
E d. Note: This time three years ago, it was impossible to escape the ghost of Gary Moretti. The nation was entranced by the ubiquitous Tozzi photograph, the hour-long specials on NBC and CBS, and... ›› read more
March 23, 2009
“Are you Middle-Eastern?” She leaned forward with her knees pressed together. “I'm Italian and Polish.” It was a common misconception. He had dark eyes, dark hair, and over the tanned skin of his... ›› read more
April

Fiction

April 14, 2009
Your little sister is late. Outside the terminal, a slight drizzle slants in the orange streetlights. Everyone else on your flight has long since been picked up or connected to another destination... ›› read more

Column

April 16, 2009
Los Angeles. The city of (fallen) angels has lured many crime fiction writers over the years, its truths often stranger than fiction. From Hollywood to Echo Park, L.A. is a siren song of corruption,... ›› read more
April 30, 2009
Hard Case Crime recently turned 50. The independent publishing house dedicated to all things pulp has published over 50 titles since it opened for business in 2005. And what a business for lovers of... ›› read more
May

Radio Hour

May 7, 2009
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson May 2009:
June

Radio Hour

June 5, 2009
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson June 2009:
July

Column

July 16, 2009
By now, fans of Hard Case Crime's brand of pulp crime fiction already know Jason Starr. Along with the delightfully cynical crime writer Ken Bruen of Ireland, Starr co-authored Bust, Slide, and The... ›› read more

Fiction

July 30, 2009
“I find myself inclined to stop a moment in my present station, and to ponder that voyage, which I have undertaken...I am first affrighted and confounded with that forlorn solitude, in which I am... ›› read more
August

Radio Hour

August 13, 2009
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson August 2009:
September

Fiction

September 3, 2009
When I got to Matt's house, he met me at the door with this puzzled look on his face. There were strangers in the living room. “Who are they?” I asked. “I don't know.” “Jehovah's Witnesses? Mormons... ›› read more

Column

September 4, 2009
My birth mother sends me messages on MySpace. She's 68 years old, creeping around a website where friend is a verb and teenagers want someone to tell them they're pretty. She lives alone. She drinks... ›› read more
September 12, 2009
(Little, Brown, 423 pages hardcover, $27.99) The Dutch painter Hieronymous Bosch used color on vast triptychs to articulate his fantastical visions of morality, in works such as The Garden of Earthly... ›› read more
October

Fiction

October 6, 2009
You’ll probably find this funny, because people usually find it funny when I tell them. I used to work as a waiter at this place called Merry Olde England British Pub over in Five Points. Obviously,... ›› read more

Radio Hour

October 12, 2009
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson October 2009:

Book Reviews

October 12, 2009
What does it mean when science gives pathological names to traits like, say, extreme introversion and social discomfort? Does it flatten their human meaning or offer a much-need identity and support... ›› read more
November

Radio Hour

November 5, 2009
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson November 2009:
December

Book Reviews

December 5, 2009
For Brain Tesesco, life as an adolescent is — much like his Napoleonic physical stature — nasty, brutish, and short. There is no figure more wretched than a dweebish alpha-male aspirant. An... ›› read more

2010

2010
January

Radio Hour

January 7, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman January 2010:
February

Radio Hour

February 4, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman February 2010:
March

Book Reviews

March 11, 2010
In A Lesser Day , Andrea Scrima's first novel/memoir, each of its short chapters is urgently scrawled out from a new loft studio in New York or Germany, each of them addressed to a constantly... ›› read more

Column

March 24, 2010
When I was 25, I got married and stayed married for eight weeks to a man with a name like a comb-over. Let's call him Wallace. Wallace was six feet six inches tall. He had a buzz cut, wore shiny and... ›› read more
April

Book Reviews

April 7, 2010
Zachary Mason's The Lost Books of The Odyssey isn't a novel or a collection of short stories, but exactly what its preface promises: a series of “concise variations on Odysseus's story that omit... ›› read more
April 28, 2010
For years I've been telling friends, acquaintances, even people at parties I speak to for five minutes, to read Jean-Philippe Toussaint. But I always have difficulty recommending a novel of his to... ›› read more

Radio Hour

April 10, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman April 2010:

Fiction

April 12, 2010
one lightsoff acceleration go and he found himself moving arrhythmically across the surface of an abandoned parking lot and she was backlit by the diffident blaze of a burning mailbox at the edge of... ›› read more
May

Book Reviews

May 14, 2010
‘In the beginning there was no God. There was no time or space. There was just light and darkness. And it was perfect.' Olga Tokarczuk's fictional village – Primeval – rests in the heart of Southern... ›› read more
May 19, 2010
Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever is a collection of 16 short stories, all of them focused on (and often narrated by) wayward suburban teenagers and twentysomethings. Intentionally or not, there... ›› read more

Radio Hour

May 18, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman May 2010:
June

Radio Hour

June 3, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman June 2010:

Book Reviews

June 10, 2010
Don't ask me about the three delays of Charlie Smith's new novel, Three Delays . Who or what's delayed, when, why – whether there are any delays at all – I couldn't tell you. This isn't a book that... ›› read more
July

Fiction

July 4, 2010
I stub my toe on a woman. She's spread out next to the tub. Her breasts rise and fall. I reach down and rub the hair on her legs. There's a skirt over her important areas. She's got a face like a... ›› read more

Book Reviews

July 4, 2010
Upon beginning Kazys Boruta's novel Whitehorn's Windmill or The Unusual Events Once Upon a Time in the Land of PaudruvÄ— , the reader will first be struck – and perhaps put off – by the simple,... ›› read more
July 30, 2010
“The public has lost their courage to believe. They've even given up their ability to think. They can no longer even form their opinions, they absorb their opinions, sitting slack-jawed in front of... ›› read more

Radio Hour

July 8, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman July 2010 Happy Birthday Ratso:
August

Book Reviews

August 1, 2010
Am I a Redundant Human Being? This question is the title of Austrian writer Mela Hartwig's early 20th-century novel – now out from Dalkey Archive Press in a translation by Kerrie Pierce – and Hartwig... ›› read more
September

Fiction

September 4, 2010
Un—Ophelia She looked angry.Her: “What did you mean by that?” Me: “Well, I just meant that your eyes are pretty, like deep pools of indigo sky.” Her: “Oh, so you're once again judging me based on... ›› read more

Book Reviews

September 13, 2010
With its light tenor and hard to pin humor, Matthew Sharpe's new novel You Were Wrong is a smartly enjoyable inquiry into the unfortunate situation of Long Island high school math teacher Karl Floor... ›› read more
September 20, 2010
In The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, May Kasahara is a teenage girl with an amoral sense of humor. When her neighbor, the protagonist, descends into an abandoned well to contemplate his... ›› read more
September 27, 2010
If – somehow – a dolphin actually clubbed Elijah Wood death, would I find this funny? I don't think so: it would probably be horrifying, frightening, too strange for me to accept. But even asking... ›› read more
October

Book Reviews

October 3, 2010
So I see myself as a sort of subject that I am observing, as someone walking along beside me, and I'm starting to have thoughts about my new companion, such as he is. Gert Jonke opens The Distant... ›› read more
October 4, 2010
If you're our age and into fiction you have to act like there's a lot of new stuff out there to know about – secret, underground literary things that are making things new again. There isn't. It's no... ›› read more
October 10, 2010
"Pirates are a perfect picture of a person piecemeal, falling apart,” a character pronounces near the end of Terese Svoboda's Pirate Talk or Mermalade . Given the novel that precedes this statement,... ›› read more
October 18, 2010
Why would I read a book by a young American writer about what it's like to be an old Hungarian composer? Especially an old Hungarian composer who was at Terezín?After reading Andrew Ervin's first... ›› read more
October 25, 2010
The most recent in the outpouring of Roberto Bolaá±o translations is The Insufferable Gaucho , a collection of short stories and two essays. After finishing the opening story “Jim,” I surmised,... ›› read more

Radio Hour

October 7, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman October 2010 :
October 7, 2010
KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman October 2010 :

Fiction

October 22, 2010
My mother is always losing the mates to her shoes. She returns late at night. When I get up for a glass of water, I find her passed out on the couch, one shoe lonely on the floor. By the time the sun... ›› read more
November

Book Reviews

November 1, 2010
Despite Lindsay Hunter's decision to name her new book Daddy's , there are more than just fathers stalking, squalling, seducing and suffering in these 210 sordid little pages. That being said,... ›› read more
November 8, 2010
“Don't you know? It always ends with Jewish heads bleeding." This autumn witnesses a wonderful event in the world of literature: the re-publication of a forgotten classic, Israel Joshua Singer's The... ›› read more
November 15, 2010
Human beings have two systems for making sense of their universe, two ways of understanding the seemingly unfathomable pain and suffering and sorrow and even beauty of their lives. The first is art,... ›› read more
November 22, 2010
Putting aside its kitsch and recent surge in popularity, the spy genre can be engrossing and worthwhile if it is innovative. If it rests on a muddled mix of clichés, as Joshua Sobol's novel Cut... ›› read more

Radio Hour

November 4, 2010
:

Demo of the Month

November 9, 2010
Where Shall I be:
December

Book Reviews

December 5, 2010
If his new short story collection Changing the Subject has an ambitious title, Stephen-Paul Martin gets away with it. And it's not only because of his change-ups between eco-terrorism, women with... ›› read more
December 14, 2010
Translated from Polish by Bill Johnston, who received a National Endowment for the Arts Poetry Fellowship in Translation, Stone Upon Stone by Wieslaw MyÅ›liwski is built on big questions about... ›› read more

2011

2011
January

Radio Hour

January 7, 2011
Poor Sound Quality for The Music KGB Radio Hour With Mark Jacobson And Larry Ratso Sloman January 2011 Poor Sound Quality :

Non-Fiction

January 13, 2011
“The serious answers to serious questions are in my books,” Jáchym Topol, the noted Czech writer, tells the audience at Manchester's annual literature festival, where he is giving a reading from... ›› read more

Book Reviews

January 19, 2011
It is late at night in a train station in the Uttar Pradesh province in Northern India. Four men of various ages are sharing the waiting room when a young couple walks in, then walks out. The sight... ›› read more

Fiction

January 27, 2011
[Excerpt] The reading room of the Soviet Jewry Library had been converted into a makeshift presentation hall. It was lined on either side with tall metal shelves buckling under the weight of an... ›› read more
February

Fiction

February 3, 2011
Monday is coming to an end in Melbourne. Alajuela is in ciesta. Granada is having dinner. Beirut is getting drunk. Buda and Pest are tucked in for the night. But many are on the internet at the same... ›› read more
February 25, 2011
You’ve sweated an hour on the B train. You’ve seen the pink, gondola-shaped crystal chandeliers in the Venezia Catering Hall on Coney Island Avenue, the miniature gilded Eiffel Towers lining the... ›› read more
February 26, 2011
A city of pieces, he thought. From the helicopter, croppings of stunted trees tufted from the wreckage like sidewalk moss. Building façades resembled peeling carrot skins. The sun was a white china... ›› read more

Book Reviews

February 6, 2011
The protagonists of Lars Iyer's first novel, Spurious , are two British academics. They make off-hand esoteric references – to cryptic thinkers like Emmanuel Levinas and Gilles Deleuze, to rarefied... ›› read more
February 15, 2011
Barbara Browning's exciting debut novel, The Correspondence Artist , published by Two Dollar Radio, revolves around four love stories, all of which are actually the same love story, but none of which... ›› read more
February 21, 2011
When I see “New and Selected Stories” on the cover of a book, I usually cringe. Regardless of the merit of the individual fictions within, such a retrospective work generally amounts to the literary... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

February 11, 2011
Perhaps it's ironic. The morning I'm to drive out to Long Island and meet with Carl Safina, one of the leading voices sounding the alarm on global warming, I'm stranded by snow. An inspired storm the... ›› read more
February 11, 2011
Perhaps it's ironic. The morning I'm to drive out to Long Island and meet with Carl Safina, one of the leading voices sounding the alarm on global warming, I'm stranded by snow. An inspired storm the... ›› read more
February 11, 2011
The world is dying. With avatars replacing humans and the birth rate non-existent, the human race is almost extinct. In the end, it comes down to .... Jeff Somers. Actually, you'll have to read Jeff'... ›› read more
March

Book Reviews

March 1, 2011
There exists a brand of individual whose life comes down to a story: men and women whose lives are irrevocably defined by a series of indelible childhood events. We know little of the life story of... ›› read more
March 7, 2011
Does anyone remember the plots of detective novels? According to legend, not even their authors. It's said that as they filmed The Big Sleep , Humphrey Bogart and Howard Hawks, as confused by all the... ›› read more
March 15, 2011
It's not uncommon these days to hear a literary critic bemoan the decline of the short story. But despite the handwringing, the last decade has given us some extraordinary short story collections,... ›› read more
March 22, 2011
Thaddeus Rutkowski's Haywire is composed of 49 pieces of painful and funny flash fiction narrated by the son of a Polish-American father and a Chinese mother. Though lacking an overarching story, the... ›› read more
March 28, 2011
“Noisy selfwilled man. Full of his son. He is right. Something to hand on. If little Rudy had lived. See him grow up. Hear his voice in the house. Walking beside Molly in an Eton suit. My son. Me in... ›› read more

Fiction

March 4, 2011
He paced back and forth in his Hershey-stained briefs. The muscles in his bare legs bulged out as he paraded across the carpeted floor. With arms akimbo, chin in the air, and an official Karate Kid... ›› read more
April

Book Reviews

April 11, 2011
Populated by folks scraping by under the poverty line in a rural setting, Alan Heathcock 's Volt (Graywolf Press) easily qualifies as country noir, Winter's Bone with fewer meth addicts. A son helps... ›› read more
April 19, 2011
The hardboiled mystery is so familiar to readers and film viewers, it's become a platform for almost endless invention. With novels like A Scanner Darkly , Philip K. Dick may have been among the... ›› read more
April 26, 2011
In the 262 pages of The Coffins of Little Hope (Unbridled Books), Timothy Schaffert packs 61 chapters, 11 “parts,” a kidnapping drama, a bestselling children's fantasy series, a local newspaper's... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

April 14, 2011
I met Sean Ferrell ( www.byseanferrell.com ), author of Numb (Harper Perennial) at Old Town Bar on Eighteenth Street in Manhattan on a rainy Friday evening. It was noisy and crowded, though the... ›› read more
May

Non-Fiction

May 3, 2011
“Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.” ~PlatoWhile we didn't have a chance to meet up with Plato (can't even find him on Facebook!), KGB was able to track down a true renascence man, Kevin... ›› read more
May 3, 2011
“Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.” ~PlatoWhile we didn't have a chance to meet up with Plato (can't even find him on Facebook!), KGB was able to track down a true renascence man, Kevin... ›› read more
May 6, 2011
If you did not grow up just like Seamus O'Grady- the self-immersed, angry and ultimately lovable hero of Kyle Smith's novel 85A- then you must have known someone who did. He is the kid that everybody... ›› read more

Book Reviews

May 16, 2011
Justin Cartwright's new novel, Other People's Money (Bloomsbury), is a biting satire of the financial collapse of a bank following the steep economic falls of 2008. Set in the morality-upended world... ›› read more
May 24, 2011
Where would personalities who are grandiose, exceptional, and extraordinary even in their awfulness fit in? Richard III wages that he will be evil; the mass murderers of a totalitarian regime, by... ›› read more

Fiction

May 19, 2011
His wife suggested they trade-in for a shorter fat man. Of course, he’d already investigated that. “What,” she said, “now you’re not talking to me?” There would be a connection fee—the equivalent of... ›› read more
May 27, 2011
Alone in the house with his wife's Peruvian maid, his emotions get the better of him. The sun is setting in the kitchen, its last rays illuminating the fading yellow wallpaper. She sits across him at... ›› read more
May 31, 2011
On our island, no woman may cook on a fire that was lit by a man. No one may touch the foot of a chief. “Who made these rules?” asked our chief's son, while we sat cross-legged around the kava bowl,... ›› read more
June

Book Reviews

June 21, 2011
A novel of place and character, R. Zamora Linmark 's Leche ( Coffee House Press ) focuses on six days in the life of Vicente “Vince” de Los Reyes, as he returns to his birthplace, the Philippines,... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

June 27, 2011
Roy Kesey, author of Nothing in the World , All Over , and Pacazo , was kind enough to take the time to answer a few questions for KGB Bar Lit. KGB : Prior to publishing your novel, Pacazo, you'd... ›› read more
July

Fiction

July 9, 2011
According to Danish philosopher, Bernard Claw, gimcrack corncrake and give the dog a bone, the self is the self when the self is not being the self, assuming, of course, the self is entirely selfless... ›› read more
August

Book Reviews

August 2, 2011
Netsuke (Coffee House Press) opens with a loathsome scene of debauched lust, and from there goes further and further down the rabbit hole into the twisted wonderland of the narrator's mind. But do... ›› read more
August 29, 2011
Rae Bryant 's The Indefinite State of Imaginary Morals (Patasola Press) is a book about love and sex, but that description is the only one that will make Morals seem typical. Bryant has a unique... ›› read more

Fiction

August 8, 2011
Chapter 1 - Bed Board Baldwin Wallace turned the page. It was late into the night and he was alone in bed, reading from The Book of Ash. He was also waiting, anxiously so, for Nadine, his wife of six... ›› read more
September

Non-Fiction

September 6, 2011
KGB sat down with Howard Kogan, a social worker and psychoanalyst, who is directing his energies of late on poetry and creative writing. His new book of poems, Indian Summer , recently released by... ›› read more
September 6, 2011
KGB sat down with Howard Kogan, a social worker and psychoanalyst, who is directing his energies of late on poetry and creative writing. His new book of poems, Indian Summer , recently released by... ›› read more

Book Reviews

September 13, 2011
Jesmyn Ward 's novel Salvage the Bones (Bloomsbury) is a slow burn over the eleven days leading up to Hurricane Katrina, following the life of Esch, a pregnant teen in rural Louisiana who is obsessed... ›› read more
September 23, 2011
The mythical town of Stitchings is coming apart at the seams: unfortunate deaths riddle the town, snow never melts, the people are preoccupied with war, and monkeys from a traveling circus have put... ›› read more
September 28, 2011
‘The meaning of life is purely a Russian fabrication. We fabricated it for the very same reason the Asians fabricated Buddhism: presumably from want of life's basic necessities.' Vyacheslav Pyetsukh... ›› read more
October

Book Reviews

October 12, 2011
“Why bother?” From the mouth of a stubborn pubescent, this question usually gets a smirk. However, in the case of Mathea Martinsen, the protagonist of Kjersti A. Skomsvold 's touching and spare debut... ›› read more
October 18, 2011
The Lake Banana Yoshimoto, Trans. Michael EmmerichMelville House, 2011It's been said that two characters make a dialogue, and three create a scene. Banana Yoshimoto's most recent novel to appear in... ›› read more
October 25, 2011
Khaled Mattawa, a leading English translator of Arabic poetry, often raises the issue of how a book might travel out of one culture and into another. From thematic incongruities, to language barriers... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

October 24, 2011
Douglas Light is rolling, and not just on his Triumph. His first novel, East Fifth Bliss , a coming of age story about a man (Morris Bliss) who should have come of age years ago, has been made into... ›› read more
October 24, 2011
Douglas Light is rolling, and not just on his Triumph. His first novel, East Fifth Bliss , a coming of age story about a man (Morris Bliss) who should have come of age years ago, has been made into... ›› read more
November

Book Reviews

November 2, 2011
“ It's not for everyone, ” explains Joe, proprietor of Lightning Rods, Inc., to a bewildered new applicant. “We're looking for the kind of woman who is confident about herself. The kind of woman who... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

November 23, 2011
I am always interested in the distinctive characteristics of people native to American cities, especially on the East Coast, where metropolises such as Boston and New York, only a soft drink and... ›› read more
December

Book Reviews

December 13, 2011
You will be reading Dukla (Dalkey Archive Press), Andrzej Stasiuk ’s meditation on the titular Polish resort town, and suddenly you will realize you haven’t been reading at all. You’ve been lost in a... ›› read more
December 21, 2011
There exists an old adage, or so we're told in Gianni Rodari's Lamberto, Lamberto, Lamberto (Melville House), “that the man whose name is spoken remains alive.” Ruminations on legacy aside—and indeed... ›› read more

2012

2012
January

Book Reviews

January 9, 2012
Ben Lerner 's Leaving the Atocha Station (Coffee House Press) marks the poet's first foray into prose fiction—with, it has to be said, very impressive results. This is an unusual American novel,... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

January 20, 2012
I recently had the opportunity to connect with Dan North, a man who is a natural paragon for environmentalists, as well as being an accomplished writer and published author. Dan's new book, The Slow... ›› read more
February

Book Reviews

February 5, 2012
‘He was a social democrat and a fool, but may the Lord grant him eternal glory.' There is a moment in Ladislav Klíma's previous novel from Twisted Spoon Press, The Sufferings of Prince , where the... ›› read more
February 14, 2012
Almost two years have passed since Liu Xiaobo, the poet, professor and political dissident, won the Nobel Peace Prize (becoming the first person from mainland China to receive the distinction)... ›› read more
February 19, 2012
The namesake story of Thomas P. Balázs 's debut collection, Omicron Ceti III (Aqueous Books), opens with a list by Erik, the wry and institutionalized main character. As well-developed a personality... ›› read more
March

Book Reviews

March 6, 2012
Recently, there was a major news story about Russian scientists in Antarctica who, after drilling down through over two miles of ice, had reached Lake Vostok, the largest sub-glacial lake in the... ›› read more
March 19, 2012
Set against the backdrop of Russian history from the time of Peter the Great to the post-Soviet collapse, Stephan Eirik Clark 's debut collection of short stories Vladimir's Mustache ({encode=" http... ›› read more
March 27, 2012
Everyone has encountered the freeloader. He's the guy who was always hanging around, having a good time, never footing the bill or pitching in. He's the guy who, as Nescio describes him in his story... ›› read more

Fiction

March 24, 2012
There ain't shit on TV on a Saturday afternoon. My buddy Lyle and I come in here after our morning shifts and knock back a couple and bitch about how there's nothing to look at except the girl... ›› read more
April

Book Reviews

April 3, 2012
In Kevin Barry 's new novel City of Bohane (Graywolf Press), it is easy to be swept under by the sheer inventiveness of his writing and the deeply imagined shape of the world he's created. Bohane, a... ›› read more
April 24, 2012
Whenever a big test match bubbles up to the international sports headlines, I start to get uncomfortable. As a sports fan, I want to like—or at least understand—cricket, but I've never been able to... ›› read more
May

Book Reviews

May 15, 2012
Toggling in time between modern-day Russia, the Siege of Leningrad, and the ineffable romance of Paris, Andreï Makine 's rather short, but rarely sweet novel, The Life of an Unknown Man (Graywolf... ›› read more
June

Book Reviews

June 5, 2012
Perhaps most famous for its seven-hour film adaptation by Bela Tarr, this is the first translation of Lazlo Krasznahorkai 's breakthrough novel, Satantango (New Directions), to appear in English... ›› read more
June 25, 2012
Antigone's story is perhaps the most tragic in the Oedipal cycle – the story of the seed, the victim, the side-effect, of the accidental incestuous coupling of her father with Oedipus's mother,... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

June 19, 2012
To borrow a baseball phrase (the season is upon us, you know, and the Yankees AND the Mets are winning!) Jill Dearman is the “triple threat” of the literary world – acclaimed author, innovative... ›› read more
July

Non-Fiction

July 5, 2012
Richard C. Morais, author of the international bestseller The Hundred-Foot Journey, is the Editor of Barron's Penta in New York. An American raised in Switzerland, he was Forbes's European Bureau... ›› read more
July 5, 2012
Richard C. Morais, author of the international bestseller The Hundred-Foot Journey, is the Editor of Barron's Penta in New York. An American raised in Switzerland, he was Forbes's European Bureau... ›› read more

Fiction

July 25, 2012
In 1988, to see Humberto Pacheco in his homeless man's attire, overgrown coat sleeves and no undershirt, a knotted rope tightening his waist band, bare unshaven balls in the shadow of his opened... ›› read more
September

Book Reviews

September 9, 2012
Michael Kimball 's new novel, BIG RAY ( Bloomsbury ), about a man's deceased 500 pound father, is a slim 180 pages of more than 500 short entries ranging in size from a couple of paragraphs to a... ›› read more
October

Fiction

October 2, 2012
He was a champion sleeper and could knock off consciousness at a moments notice to descend into dreams thick with his waking joys and sorrows. It was a skill he always had, ever since he was a child... ›› read more

Book Reviews

October 3, 2012
As if the psychological fallout of war wasn't a poignant enough trope (namely Afghanistan), Hold It ‘Til It Hurts ( Coffee House Press ) takes on the intricate delicacies of identity, family, and the... ›› read more
October 19, 2012
Looking at them collectively, the premises of J. Robert Lennon 's novels may at times seem like particular creative writing assignments that he has given to himself. On the Night Plain , his third,... ›› read more
November

Book Reviews

November 18, 2012
It's Fine By Me ( Graywolf Press ) is a familiar story of a tough kid, a menacing father, and a lonely and often brutal coming of age. The plot is a good fit for Per Petterson 's brusque style and... ›› read more
November 28, 2012
The Sky Conducting , Michael J. Seidlinger 's debut novel, is a sometimes unsettling, often dry entry into the annals of post-apocalyptic dystopian literature. In it, America is dead of an unknown... ›› read more

2013

2013
January

Book Reviews

January 29, 2013
The short story has long been a hotbed for the wicked, off-kilter, anomalous, and unnoticeable. Blame the brevity of the genre's form, which allows for a degree of leniency with backstory, character... ›› read more
February

Book Reviews

February 12, 2013
Percival Everett by Virgil Russell (Graywolf Press) is distinguished English professor and prolific author Percival Everett 's twenty-fifth novel and is being hailed -- as the dizzying title reflects... ›› read more
February 18, 2013
The National Stadium in Santiago, Chile, was built in 1938, and in its first decades played host to many major events, including the World Cup in 1962. After September 11th, 1973, when a coup d'etat... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

February 18, 2013
Jesse Prinz, Philosopher Extraordinaire, cognitive scientist and aesthetician, is currently a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate Center, CUNY. His most recent book is Beyond Human... ›› read more
February 27, 2013
Last October, City Lights Books published Don Bajema's collection of 46 stories, Winged Shoes and a Shield. These luminous, closely-connected stories follow the coming of age of Eddie Burnett, who... ›› read more
March

Book Reviews

March 4, 2013
Going in to Melissa Harrison 's debut novel, Clay ( Bloomsbury ), it helps to understand the extent to which the focus of the book comes from the author's own personal perspective. Harrison grew up... ›› read more
March 9, 2013
The Story of My Purity 's narrator, Piero Rosini, teeters on the edge of his fanatical Catholic faith. He doesn't realize this, of course, but we do. As we observe Piero looking for a way out of his... ›› read more
April

Book Reviews

April 2, 2013
Edwin Trommelen 's Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka (Russian Life Books) is as comprehensive a book as one could hope to find on the six-hundred year love/hate affair between Russia and vodka, the... ›› read more
April 15, 2013
In fifteenth century Italy, the zibaldone appeared. A new type of book, the zibaldone collected bits and pieces of various texts according to its compiler's taste, adhering to no other discernible... ›› read more
April 21, 2013
Billed as an "existential murder mystery," Norah Labiner 's fourth novel, Let the Dark Flower Blossom ( Coffee House Press ), will subsume you. It's a protean universe -- lush with scandal, violence... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

April 12, 2013
Ken Kalfus's last novel, the National Book Award-nominated A Disorder Peculiar to the Country, opens with a husband and wife on 9/11, each wondering about the other's fate. You might have heard that... ›› read more
May

Non-Fiction

May 1, 2013
It is one of my great pleasures to meet and work with many talented writers. One is Diane Spodarek (pictured here), a rocking writer who is working on an eclectic new book, The Drunk Monologues. She... ›› read more
May 1, 2013
Once upon a time, Lynne Thompson asked herself, “What is missing from my life?” The answer was poetry. Sixteen years later, she is truly a working poet. Ms. Thompson is the author of two full-length... ›› read more
May 1, 2013
It is one of my great pleasures to have the opportunity to meet and work with many talented writers. One is Diane Spodarek, a rocking rennoseance woman who is working on an eclectic new book, The... ›› read more
May 1, 2013
It is one of my great pleasures to meet and work with many talented writers. One is Diane Spodarek (pictured here), a rocking writer who is working on an eclectic new book, The Drunk Monologues. She... ›› read more

Book Reviews

May 2, 2013
Works in translation occupy a strange, pleasing limbo for well-rounded readers. Typically they enter public notice after the first cycle of literary prizes abroad has rained down on the head of the... ›› read more
May 13, 2013
*****Original Message***** ( Hunt & Light ) exists precisely at the place where people write forlorn Facebook statuses instead of diary entries. The title, stylized with five asterisks on either... ›› read more
May 23, 2013
“Soon though, it became clear the blog was missing a key element, a sagacity that comes with age that could activate the yeast, as it were, and bring the loaf of true thought into the world. The blog... ›› read more
June

Book Reviews

June 10, 2013
Heroism is one of those things that you can see only if you don't look at it too closely. Even though we know better, Americans still want to view the earliest decades of the American republic as... ›› read more
July

Book Reviews

July 6, 2013
Roughly ten years after his singular and eye-opening philosophical work Straw Dogs , John Gray has returned with The Silence of Animals (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) to once again take humankind down a... ›› read more

Fiction

July 12, 2013
“Do you feel there are too many limitations placed on you? On your relationships? On your life?” Israel Benito Canseco was eleven years old and he sold personal development for twenty-five pesos. “... ›› read more
July 30, 2013
We called him Rob, Robby, sometimes even RPG, his full name being Robert Peter Garretson. He lived in a small studio apartment with his girlfriend in a flashier part of Brooklyn than where I lived... ›› read more
August

Book Reviews

August 6, 2013
Foolish behavior is a key ingredient of human nature. We tend to waste a great deal of our vitality pursuing goals of dubious value. Confronting this basic truth, writers have a few options. They can... ›› read more
September

Book Reviews

September 2, 2013
From the beginning there is a mood of claustrophobia and stifled, unaired rooms in Merethe Lindstr ø m 's prize-winning novel, Days in the History of Silence ( Other Press ). The story opens with an... ›› read more
September 24, 2013
Abby Geni 's debut short story collection, The Last Animal ( Counterpoint Press ), seeks, in her own words, to explore "one of the great illusions of the human experience... that we are somehow... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

September 3, 2013
KGBBAR.LIT appreciates writers who not only are devoted to their craft, but also to helping others succeed in this often isolating and difficult business. Such is the case with Bonnie Ditlevsen, a... ›› read more
September 3, 2013
At 27, I bought a one-way ticket to India. I had no idea what I'd do when I landed, but in the past my most rewarding experiences came when I let intuition be my guide. So, I traveled without an... ›› read more
September 3, 2013
KGBBAR.LIT appreciates writers who not only are devoted to their craft, but also to helping others succeed in this often isolating and difficult business. Such is the case with Bonnie Ditlevsen, a... ›› read more
September 3, 2013
At 27, I bought a one-way ticket to India. I had no idea what I'd do when I landed, but in the past my most rewarding experiences came when I let intuition be my guide. So, I traveled without an... ›› read more
September 3, 2013
KGBBAR.LIT appreciates writers who not only are devoted to their craft, but also to helping others succeed in this often isolating and difficult business. Such is the case with Bonnie Ditlevsen, a... ›› read more
September 16, 2013
An occasional look into pivotal moments in writers' lives. "The spaces I have been privy to are phenomenally unusual." Based upon my conversation with poet Nomi Stone, I agree with her assessment of... ›› read more

Fiction

September 12, 2013
“Old man,” said Youngae to her husband. “What are you doing? At your age, Doctors Without Borders? North Korea ?”Yungman had pondered on this strange turn of fate. How he had always wanted to work... ›› read more
September 18, 2013
Landau walks in the middle of the street. Every night he finds himself more impressed by the quietness of the ghetto. Such a disorderly place, and now so silent. As silent as the salon where he will... ›› read more
October

Book Reviews

October 4, 2013
Daniel, the narrator of Dan Beachy-Quick 's novel, An Impenetrable Screen of Purest Sky ( Coffee House Press ), waltzes through time like a boy through a crumbling house. That's perhaps, the first,... ›› read more
October 17, 2013
Introduced to this “part dream-memoir, part semi-fictive journey through a hallucinatory Bucharest,” in the jacket copy, one cracks open the 464-page Blinding ( Archipelago Books ) anticipating some... ›› read more

Fiction

October 16, 2013
July 15th For as long as I can remember, whenever I walk around Manhattan, I notice spaces where I could take shelter if I were homeless. The trouble, or the blessing rather, is that I don't have an... ›› read more
November

Non-Fiction

November 1, 2013
Adam Berlin is the literary equivalent of the boxer who relishes the craft, the pugilist who respects the “sweet science” to such a degree that he willingly pays his dues, is patient to wait his turn... ›› read more
November 1, 2013
Adam Berlin is the literary equivalent of the boxer who relishes the craft, the pugilist who respects the “sweet science” to such a degree that he willingly pays his dues, is patient to wait his turn... ›› read more
November 4, 2013
In the literary universe, I find that poets are usually the most humble of writers, with subtle, dry wits, an admirable penchant for solitude, and a dogged dedication to their craft. They are the... ›› read more
November 4, 2013
In the literary universe, I find that poets are usually the most humble of writers, with subtle, dry wits, an admirable penchant for solitude, and a dogged dedication to their craft. They are the... ›› read more
November 12, 2013
Jennifer Militello is the author of three collections of poetry: Body Thesaurus (Tupelo Press, 2013), Flinch of Song (Tupelo Press, 2009), winner of the Tupelo Press First Book Award, and the... ›› read more
November 18, 2013
My version of the ideal writing life includes: months-long stretches in a cottage on Cape Cod Bay; manuscripts completed without interruption by toilet overflows, grocery shopping, or piles of rank... ›› read more
December

Book Reviews

December 2, 2013
To read Robert Walser is to fall under the enchantment of a particularly open and youthful enthusiasm. His essays of Fritz Kocher, which comprise the first part of this new collection of mostly never... ›› read more
December 8, 2013
It isn't terribly difficult to imagine why Janet Frame might have chosen to stipulate that In the Memorial Room (Counterpoint Press) be published only after her death. Based on Frame's own experience... ›› read more

Fiction

December 5, 2013
Q: A: So right before the funeral, she walked in on me. She saw what she saw. Q:A: Not the kitchen. She keeps saying it was the kitchen. It was the bathroom off the kitchen, which is an entirely... ›› read more

2014

2014
January

Book Reviews

January 8, 2014
Chances are you have heard someone, a creative type or otherwise, romantically reflect on their youth as a time of boundless energy when they were out to ‘set the world on fire,' or something similar... ›› read more
January 14, 2014
Christopher Merkner 's debut story collection, The Rise & Fall of the Scandamerican Domestic ( Coffee House Press ), knows one big thing about us: given the choice between hideous violence and... ›› read more
January 14, 2014
Christopher Merkner 's debut story collection, The Rise & Fall of the Scandamerican Domestic ( Coffee House Press ), knows one big thing about us: given the choice between hideous violence and... ›› read more
January 22, 2014
Rachel Cantor 's blast of a debut novel, A Highly Unlikely Scenario ( Melville House ), is one of the more efficient Literary Pleasure Delivery Systems available so far in 2014, and also one of the... ›› read more
February

Book Reviews

February 11, 2014
If we start from Randall Jarrell's definition of a novel as “a prose narrative of some length that has something wrong with it,” Elizabeth Mikesch 's new book, Niceties: Aural Ardor, Pardon Me (... ›› read more
February 24, 2014
It is fitting in a number of ways that The Jesus Lizard Book ( Akashic Books ) now exists. Given their sense of humor, in a way it seems only natural that the Jesus Lizard, the most concomitantly... ›› read more
March

Book Reviews

March 9, 2014
Years ago, fresh cut from one of those breakups that forces you to alter your daily life on the most minute levels, I was attending the wedding of a family member marrying her first love after a few... ›› read more
March 17, 2014
Is the personal political? David Burr Gerrard 's debut novel Short Century ( Barnacle Books/Rare Bird ) answers that question strongly in the affirmative, at least in the life of journalist Arthur... ›› read more
March 31, 2014
It takes a genius to title a book something as emphatically negative as Can't and Won't (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Short story maestro Lydia Davis won the coveted MacArthur Foundation award a... ›› read more

Fiction

March 27, 2014
There was once a girl who went to the Emerald City (no, Linnea, they told you it's called Seattle, stop talking like it's that kind of Emerald City). She went there once, when she was a younger woman... ›› read more
April

Book Reviews

April 9, 2014
Rule number one of life is always this: don't make a deal with the devil. It's a simple governing rule, really; No matter how tempting, no matter how enticing, you just don't do it. But the devil is... ›› read more
April 17, 2014
Was there ever a better guarantee to the reader than an author’s connection with place? Eric Charles May ’s Bedrock Faith ( Akashic Books ) presents in fictional South Side Chicago neighborhood... ›› read more
April 28, 2014
If you're looking for proof that language naturally carries the mineral ore of poetry within it, turn to Beth Steidle 's The Static Herd ( Calamari Press ). Steidle's new book is prefaced by the... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

April 21, 2014
It is always inspiring to meet writers who are as interested in helping others craft, publish and promote their prose or poetry as they are their own. Anne James is such an individual, sharing her... ›› read more
April 21, 2014
It is always inspiring to meet writers who are as interested in helping others craft, publish and promote their prose or poetry as they are their own. Anne James is such an individual, sharing her... ›› read more
April 23, 2014
Chris Ross beat the odds: he escaped Indiana. But he didn't stop there. He went on to study writing at the City College of New York, where he earned his Master's Degree. Born & Raised, his first... ›› read more
April 23, 2014
Chris Ross beat the odds: he escaped Indiana. But he didn't stop there. He went on to study writing at the City College of New York, where he earned his Master's Degree. Born & Raised, his first... ›› read more
May

Non-Fiction

May 7, 2014
"The art of good business is being a good middleman." So it is said (often) in the underrated movie Layer Cake , starring Daniel Craig, in a role, dare I say, that is much cooler than his more famous... ›› read more

Book Reviews

May 15, 2014
In Talking to Ourselves ( Farrar, Straus and Giroux ), Andrés Neuman follows the illness and death of a young father, Mario, through the different voices of three characters as they perceive it... ›› read more
May 29, 2014
“It was my life that was lying in the middle of my life like that, like a pole-axed wildebeest.” American Innovations (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), Rivka Galchen 's first short story collection,... ›› read more
June

Non-Fiction

June 18, 2014
One writer + One focus = One storyAn occasional look into pivotal moments in writers' lives. Writing is, in many ways, translating. Author and translator David Unger sees the connection in that both... ›› read more
September

Book Reviews

September 8, 2014
Valeria Luiselli 's Faces in the Crowd , a novel, and Sidewalks , a sequence of essays, have been published simultaneously by Coffee House Press , like components of a single project, and have a... ›› read more
September 25, 2014
Out of the Dust ( Spuyten Duyvil Press ), a collection of poetry recently translated from German, offers the reader a series of stark and often surprisingly unsettling glances through the eyes of the... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

September 11, 2014
It's the end of the world and Ben H. Winters feels fine. The best-selling author has just released World of Trouble , the final book in his critically-acclaimed Last Policeman trilogy, which... ›› read more
September 22, 2014
One of my favorite recent reads was Iris Has Free Time , by Iris Smyles. Eclectic, funny, fast-paced and also reflective, there was something on every page I liked and found memorable. I am not alone... ›› read more
September 22, 2014
One of my favorite recent reads was Iris Has Free Time , by Iris Smyles. Eclectic, funny, fast-paced and also reflective, there was something on every page I liked and found memorable. I am not alone... ›› read more
September 29, 2014
Recently I had the pleasure of speaking with poet/filmmaker Marc Olmsted (photo left). In our interview we spoke about Marc's influences, his films, "The Count" and others, as well as filmmaker... ›› read more

Fiction

September 15, 2014
If we score, I'm supposed to pull the lever inside my foam suit to operate the plastic backhoe arm/bucket on my head. Coach Hoke (who he let his ghost off the leash for two minutes from sleep apnea,... ›› read more
October

Book Reviews

October 14, 2014
The characters in Monica McFawn 's Flannery O'Connor award-winning story collection Bright Shards of Someplace Else ( The University of Georgia Press ) are only loosely rooted in daily reality... ›› read more
October 21, 2014
Though doomed from birth and dead by the exodus, Antigone endures endlessly. As the central figure in Sophocles' eponymous tragedy, she was conjured—righteous and rebellious—in 441 BCE and has been... ›› read more
November

Book Reviews

November 5, 2014
Now We Will Be Happy ( University of Nebraska Press , 2014) announces in its title the doom of its characters, for of course no such declaration can possibly be fulfilled. Amina Gautier builds on her... ›› read more

Non-Fiction

November 17, 2014
After reading Lorna Owen's book Mouse Muse , you will think twice before setting out mousetraps, sprinkling poison pellets or calling the exterminator to solve your mouse problem. That squeaky... ›› read more
December

Fiction

December 9, 2014
The sign for Chief's Café in Pittsburgh was a neon fireman's hat and hose. Someone threw a rock through the right side of the sign and smashed it up, but it still glowed and buzzed like an electric... ›› read more

Book Reviews

December 17, 2014
Baby Girl and Perry, the 'fake ass thugs' at the center of Lindsay Hunter 's debut novel Ugly Girls (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), spend their days waiting for the night, the moment when they can... ›› read more